GFAP

Role of GFAP in astrocytes: Lessons from induced pluripotent stem cells in Alexander disease patients

Deriving neural precursor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells

Identifying tumoral and stromal transcriptomes that underlie tumor plasticity and stromal neuroinflammatory response in brain metastasis

Article Review: Dual effects of carbon monoxide on pericytes and neurogenesis in traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) currently contributes to nearly 30% of all injury deaths in the United States.  Characterized by an abrasive head injury that interrupts normal brain function, TBI can range from mild to severe.  Mild symptoms can present themselves as excessive tiredness, difficulty concentrating and lack of clear thinking.  Severe cases of TBI are hallmarked by unusual behavior, seizures and loss of consciousness.  Research has shown that on a molecular level TBI triggers various mechanisms of cell death alongside attempted tissue recovery, therefore Choi et al sought

Beta Tubulin III and neurogenesis

Beta tubulin III, also known as Tuj-1, is a class III member of the beta tubulin protein family. Beta tubulins are one of two structural components that form our microtubule network.

The identification of dopaminergic neurons using Tyrosine Hydroxylase in Parkinson's research and LRRK2

Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is a crucial enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine in the brain.

Synapsin I: Implicated in synaptic activity across a diverse range of studies

Synapsins are a family of neuronal proteins that are most renowned for their activity in modulating the pre-synaptic terminal.  Synapsin’s behavior is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, which alter the way that synapsin’s interact with actin filaments and other nearby proteins.  There are three isoforms of Synapsin – Synapsin I, II and III.  Synapsin I specifically localizes to the membrane of presynaptic vesicles and plays a role in regulation of axonogenesis and synaptogenesis.

Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), The Most Popular Astrocyte Marker

GFAP, a class-III intermediate filament, is a 50kDa protein which is found in the mature and developing astrocytes in the CNS, non-myelinating Schwann cells in the PNS, enteric glial cells (enteric nervous system/ENS), ependymal cells, and radial glia of the developing brain.

Nestin: Investigating the Link Between New Brain Cells and Depression

Clinical depression (also known as major depressive disorder or MDD) affects many people, but the biological processes that cause it (and are influenced by its treatments) are not well understood. Adult neurogenesis is a newly emerging field that could contribute to our knowledge of the etiology of depression and the effects of antidepressants. Nestin antibodies are key tools for this research, as they can be used to identify developing neurons.

GFAP: Roles in Alzheimer's and Schizophrenia

Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a class III intermediate filament (IF) protein and is used as a marker to distinguish astrocytes from other glial cells during development.

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