Macrophage Products


Macrophages comprise of many forms of mononuclear phagocytes found in tissues. Mononuclear phagocytes arise from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. After passing through the monoblast and promonocyte states of the monocyte stage, they enter the blood, where they circulate for about 40 hours. They then enter tissues and increase in size, phagocytic activity, and lysosomal enzyme content becoming macrophages. Among the functions of macrophages are nonspecific phagocytosis and pinocytosis, specific phagocytosis of opsonized microorganisms mediated by Fc receptors and complement receptors, killing of ingested microorganisms, digestion and presentation of antigens to T and B lymphocytes, and secretion of a large number of diverse products, including many enzymes including lysozyme and collagenases, several complement components and coagulation factors, some prostaglandins and leukotrienes, and many regulatory molecules (Interferon, Interleukin 1). Among cells that are now recognized as macrophages are histiocytes, Kupffer cells, osteoclasts, microglial cells, synovial type A cells, interdigitating cells, and Langerhans cells (in normal tissues) and epithelioid cells and Langerhans-type and foreign-body-type multinucleated giant cells (in inflamed tissues).


Entrez Human
Uniprot Human
Alternate Names
  • L-dopachrome isomerase
  • Glycosylation-inhibiting factor
  • MMIF
  • EC
  • GLIF
  • EC
  • Phenylpyruvate tautomerase
  • GIFmacrophage migration inhibitory factor
  • L-dopachrome tautomerase
  • macrophage migration inhibitory factor (glycosylation-inhibiting factor)

Research Areas for Macrophage

Find related products by research area and learn more about each of the different research areas below.

Innate Immunity