PINK1 Products

Peptides and Proteins

PINK1 Peptide
NB100-493PEP


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PINK1 Peptide
BC100-494PEP


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PINK1 Peptide
BC100-506PEP


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RNAi

PINK1 RNAi
H00065018-R03
Species Reactivity: Human


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Description

PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) is a mitochondrial serine/threonine protein kinase which is believed to protect cells from stress-induced mitochondrial degradation. PINK1 is also responsible for regulating degradation of damaged mitochondria via selective autophagy (mitophagy), and is required for PARK2 inidiated mitochondrial degradation. Mutations in this gene cause one form of autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease.

Bioinformatics

  • Entrez
  • Uniprot
  • Product By Gene ID65018
  • Alternate Names
    • BRPK
    • EC 2.7.11.1
    • FLJ27236
    • PARK6
    • Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive) 6
    • protein kinase BRPK
    • PTEN induced putative kinase 1
    • PTEN-induced putative kinase protein 1
    • serine/threonine-protein kinase PINK1, mitochondrial

Bioinformatics Tool for PINK1

Discover related pathways, diseases and genes to PINK1. Need help? Read the Bioinformatics Tool Guide for instructions on using this tool.


 

Related PINK1 Blog Posts

Check out the latest blog posts on PINK1.
PINK1 and its role in Parkinson's disease
PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1) is a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase which maintains mitochondrial function/integrity, provides protection against mitochondrial dysfunction during cellular stress, potentially by phosphorylatin...    Read more.
PINK1: Promoting Organelle Stability and Preventing Parkinson's disease
PINK1 is a protein serine/threonine kinase (PTK) that protects the organelles from cellular stress and controls selective autophagy to clear damage. Exner, et al. were among the first to report that PINK1 deficiency in humans was linked to...    Read more.
PINK1: Promoting Organelle Stability and Preventing Parkinson's disease
PINK1 is a protein serine/threonine kinase (PTK) that protects the organelles from cellular stress and controls selective autophagy to clear damage. Exner, et. al. were among the first to report that PINK1 deficiency in humans was linked t...    Read more.